Winter fire safety

More fires occur during the winter months than at any other time of the year. During the cold months, we spend more time indoors and use different methods to heat our homes. Heating was the second most common cause of home fires after cooking. The heating fires in the home reached a peak during the early evening hours between 1

7.00 and 21.00. with the highest peak between 18 and 20. and 29% of the fires for heating non-enclosed homes – fires that spread past the original object – occurred because the heat source (such as a heater or fireplace) was too close to things that could burn. It is important to keep fire safety in mind when heating your home. If you have any questions, contact our office at 413.475.7283 or fill out our quote form online today!
  • Keep everything that can burn such bedding, clothing and curtains at least 3 feet away from the heater.
  • Connect portable heaters directly to the wall outlet. Never use an extension cord or power strip.
  • Turn off the heater when you go to bed or leave the room.
  • If you use a fireplace:

    • Hold a glass or metal screen in front of the fireplace to prevent embers or sparks jump out and start a fire.
    • Do not burn paper in your fireplace.
    • Before falling asleep or leaving your home, extinguish the fire completely.
    • Pour ash into a metal container with a lid. Store the container outdoors at least 3 feet from your home.

    If you use a wood stove:

    • Have the chimney inspected and cleaned annually by a professional.
    • Store anything that can burn at least 3 feet from the stove.
    • Do not burn paper in your wood stove.
    • Before falling asleep or leaving your home, put out the fire completely.

    When heating your home, you must be aware of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and toxic gas. More than 150 people in the United States die each year from accidental CO poisoning from generators or fuel combustion appliances such as ovens, stoves, water

    heaters and fireplaces. Breathing carbon dioxide at high levels can kill you. Place CO alarms in your home to give an early warning of rising CO levels. These alarms should be placed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on all levels of your home.

    Make sure you always have a smoke alarm on all levels in your home, in the bedrooms and outside the bedrooms. Test your alarms every month. Have a plan for evacuating your home and practice your plan at least twice a year. Make sure everyone knows how to escape from your home if it burns.
    Encharter Insurance is an independent insurance agent in Amherst, MA. We can offer coverage from many insurance companies so that you get the home insurance for your budget and your needs! You can reach us at 413.475.7283 or online at encharter.com.

    Source: https://firemarshals.org/resources/Documents/News%20from%20NASFM%20-%20Home%20Page/Put%20a%20Freeze % 20on% 20Winter% 20Fires.pdf

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    More fires occur during the winter months than at any other time of the year. During the cold months, we spend more time indoors and use different methods to heat our homes. Heating was the second most common cause of home fires after cooking. The heating fires in the home reached a peak during the early evening hours between 17.00 and 21.00. with the highest peak between 18 and 20. and 29% of the fires for heating non-enclosed homes – fires that spread past the original object – occurred because the heat source (such as a heater or fireplace) was too close to things that could burn. It is important to keep fire safety in mind when heating your home. If you have any questions, contact our office at 413.475.7283 or fill out our quote form online today!

  • Keep everything that can burn such bedding, clothing and curtains at least 3 feet away from the heater.
  • Connect portable heaters directly to the wall outlet. Never use an extension cord or power strip.
  • Turn off the heater when you go to bed or leave the room.
  • If you use a fireplace:

    • Hold a glass or metal screen in front of the fireplace to prevent embers or sparks jump out and start a fire.
    • Do not burn paper in your fireplace.
    • Before falling asleep or leaving your home, extinguish the fire completely.
    • Pour ash into a metal container with a lid. Store the container outdoors at least 3 feet from your home.

    If you use a wood stove:

    • Have the chimney inspected and cleaned annually by a professional.
    • Store anything that can burn at least 3 feet from the stove.
    • Do not burn paper in your wood stove.
    • Before falling asleep or leaving your home, put out the fire completely.

    When heating your home, you must be aware of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "invisible killer" because it is a colorless, odorless and toxic gas. More than 150 people in the United States die each year from accidental CO poisoning from generators or fuel combustion appliances such as ovens, stoves, water

    heaters and fireplaces. Breathing carbon dioxide at high levels can kill you. Place CO alarms in your home to give an early warning of rising CO levels. These alarms should be placed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on all levels of your home.

    Make sure you always have a smoke alarm on all levels in your home, in the bedrooms and outside the bedrooms. Test your alarms every month. Have a plan for evacuating your home and practice your plan at least twice a year. Make sure everyone knows how to escape from your home if it burns.
    Encharter Insurance is an independent insurance agent in Amherst, MA. We can offer coverage from many insurance companies so that you get the home insurance for your budget and your needs! You can reach us at 413.475.7283 or online at encharter.com.

    Chat with an Encharter agent about your insurance today:
    413.475.7283
    Fill in our quote form online [41] Source: 0: /firemarshals.org/resources/Documents/News%20from%20NASFM%20-%20Home%20Page/Put%20a%20Freeze%20on%20Winter%20Fires.pdf